James Miskell, Attorney at Law

It is natural to focus on our families during the holiday season, to think about everything they add to our lives and how lucky we are to have them. As people think about Estate Planning, they often focus on dividing and distributing their belongings and financial assets.

James Miskell, Attorney at Law

Holidays give us the opportunity to spend more time with family. When we spend more time with our aging parents at these holiday gatherings, we often notice the early indications that a parent is slipping. You may notice a parent forgetting things or no longer participating in things he or she always enjoyed. Perhaps it is a conversation over coffee, and a short while later, Dad is repeating himself with no signs that he remembers the same conversation the two of you had that morning.

James Miskell, Attorney at Law

“Trick or treat” rings out every Halloween as children go door to door hoping for their favorite candy. My kids love sorting the candy at the end of the night and finding surprises in their candy haul.

James Miskell, Attorney at Law

The numbers vary somewhat from survey to survey, but each new study that is released reveals that large numbers of Americans do not have a will. Not having a will is shorthand for not having any estate planning in place.

James Miskell, Attorney at Law

In the middle of a Georgia summer, the days are long and it seems like we’ve got more time for the things we enjoy. The kids are out of school, and work slows down a little. If we’re lucky, we get some extra time with our family, spend lazy days at the pool, and vacation with children and grandchildren. It can feel like summer will last forever.

James Miskell, Attorney at Law

When it comes to estate planning, the most familiar document is the last will and testament. Most people have a basic understanding that a will allows you to appoint a personal representative (an executor) upon your death and directs that person to distribute your assets as you specify. Put another way, a will says who gets your stuff when you die—but until you die, it does nothing.