One study found that more than 60% of adult Americans have never discussed their estate plans with their heirs – my experience shows this number may actually be higher. Parents may hesitate to discuss death or incapacity for a variety of reasons. Children or grandchildren may be reluctant to broach the subject for fear of appearing greedy.

Roger Green, MSFS,CFP®

When planning for retirement, often the focus seems to be almost entirely on “how much can I save?”, but there are some other significant questions to consider.

As we end one year and begin another, there are things you need to think about doing to maximize your retirement assets, gain any available tax benefit, and/or avoid any tax penalty that may be linked to your investments. Here are things you should consider:

Roger Green, MSFS,CFP®

In the year in which you turn 70 ½ years of age, the current IRS guidelines require you to take a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD), by April 1 of the following year, from your Qualified accounts (tax-advantaged accounts). For each year thereafter, you must take your RMD by 12/31 each year.

Roger Green, MSFS,CFP®

Retirement planning does not end at retirement. The need to continue to grow assets to produce more cash flow remains important for most.

Roger Green, MSFS,CFP®

Just over 1 in 4 of today’s 20 year olds will become disabled before they retire.1 About 20% - or 1 in 5 American adults- have a disability according to the CDC July 2015. The majority of wage earners believe they have a 2% or less chance of being disabled for 3 months or more during their working career, but the actual odds for a worker entering the workforce today are about 25%.1 Medical problems contributed to 62% of all personal bankruptcies filed in the U.S. in 2007.2 None of us know what challenges life will bring and that is why you should consider disability insurance.