Alex Le

Top of the mornin’ Gwinnett Citizen readers! 

How many of you have heard the phrase “Millennials can’t communicate”? Whether you are a Baby-Boomer cringing when you see two young people out for dinner but they’re glued to their phones or you’re a Millennial reading this as you’re scrolling through Facebook; there is something to the concept that Millennials have issues communicating; to a degree.  

As a society, we seem incapable of having quality conversations without electronics being included in the equation. I set out to disprove this stigma, but found Millennials are the generation that spends most of their time on their phones. 

According to Catey Hill, Editor at marketwatch.com, Bank of America conducted a survey in June of this year and found 4 in 10 Millennials or 39%, say they interact more with their phones than they do with their loved ones, friends and co-workers.  This finding is compared to 1 in 3 people of all age groups who use their phones.

How many of you have been in a one-on-one conversation, and within a minute or so your friend pulls out their phone and begins using it? I can understand if it’s to check the time, but to continuously scroll through what is most likely Facebook (let’s be honest, that’s what everyone does when they’re bored), while someone is talking is improper.

Bank of America’s survey found out of 1,000 people, more than 7 in 10 millennials said they use their phones to avoid social interactions. I’ve seen this occurrence happen with people within the Baby-Boomer generation, Gen-Xers and Millennials, but Millennials are exhibiting this communication barrier more than any other generation. 

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Hill also notes that a 2014 Experian report observed the behavior of 23,000 people found millennials do use their smartphones more than any other age group. According to the report, Millennials account for 41% of the total time Americans spend on their phones, even though we only make up 29% of the population. 

Millennials, I urge you all to go without your phone for at least an hour and give someone your undivided attention. You’ll be glad you did. 

We live in a world where technology is distancing us. Let’s not lose our ability to communicate and become strangers. 

How many of you have seen this in your daily lives? What are your thoughts?

Send your comments, questions, and thoughts to diversemillenial@gmail.com