By:
Bill York

It was a flame-colored young fox that caught my attention. I have only seen a few while hunting in Georgia. It was running in a ditch alongside the road.

There was an overcast sky and a light drizzle. The road was asphalt and wet.

Fortunately, I glanced up to see a car with its turn indicator blinking, waiting to turn left.

I was driving my Buick station wagon. I stomped on my brakes. I could feel a slight bump.

I backed up a couple of feet and jumped out. The lady had lowered the window and was rubbing her neck. “You okay?” I said.

“I’m hurt.” Her voice sounded whiney.

“Want me to call an ambulance?”

”No, I called the police.”

I took photographs. When the police got there I explained the incident. He took pictures of the cars. He asked the driver if she wanted to go to the hospital.

“No. I called my husband, He will take me to my doctor,” she said, continuing to rub her neck.

A month later, I got a letter from a law firm. I was being sued for pain and suffering.

The letter was formal, listing her injuries and when they expected me to respond.

Her problems were whiplash, headaches, hearing loss, reduced sensitivity in her hands, vision impairment, muscle weakness, spinal pain, etc.

I called my insurance company. They assigned me an attorney. I explained what happened.

He said that he would handle it and to forward the letter to him.

I forgot about it until he called me later.

“There will be a meeting in my office with the plaintiff tomorrow at 10 a.m.”

We sat around a circular table, my attorney, the plaintiff, her husband, and her lawyer.

Jack said, “I have requested a trial by a jury.” He directed his remark to the woman.

“This list represents your claims.

Are you ready to testify that these injuries occurred?” “Yes,” she said.

Jack handed her the police report that showed no damage to either car, plus pictures of both cars taken by the insurance company.

Jack pointed, “I have surgeons ready to testify that this incident could not have created these severe problems.”

“But he hit me,” she said.

“Ma’am, are you aware of the penalty for perjury and insurance fraud?”

“I don’t know.”

“These are felonies punishable by time in jail, fines and other costs. Do you wish to continue this lawsuit?”

The plaintiff spoke with her husband and lawyer for several minutes then turned to my insurance representative. “No we don’t,” she said. “I have a document for you to sign,” He handed the woman a legal form.

Over coffee, he said, “We get hundreds of these, people figuring to make a buck.”

“And her ‘doctor’ runs a massage parlor.”

Bill is a 92-year old WW II Navy veteran and retired President of York Furs in Buckhead. You can contact him by email at Sioux2222@gmail.com

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