Castmates Wendy, (Left), who played Ensign Checkov, and Angel (Right), who played Wrong, with play director, author and producer, Stephanie Roth (Middle).

In dedication to former cast member Nick Cain, who left earth, “too soon”, as his friends at Creative Enterprises say. Cast to play the part of “Scotty”, Nick had already memorized his lines when he passed, and he will be forever remembered for his dramatic skill and encouraging presence.

Local non-profit Creative Enterprises took audiences on a galactic quest with its first-ever theatrical production —“The Wrath of Wrong” — a Star Trek parody written and directed by Creative’s very own Stephanie Roth.

Championing the arts through its flower-powered training and employment program, Creative Enterprises offers vocational and occupational training to adults with physical and intellectual disabilities. Under the direction of Stephanie Roth, the center launched a drama program, and Ms. Roth has been working tirelessly with the clients, preparing for their premiere performance held August 12, 2019.

“We started preparing for the play about two and a half years ago, and we experienced a lot of changes along the way. Some of the cast moved, and one client [Nick Cain] passed away. But others rose to the occasion, and it’s been incredible to see them work as a team. Some of them wanted to stop after Nick passed, but as a class, we decided he would have wanted us to continue, and so we dedicated it to him,” Roth said.

The house was packed full, and Nick’s family came to support the 10-person cast during its first public performance, held on a Monday shortly after 1:00 p.m.

Ten castmates came together to perform “The Wrath of Wrong”, a play written and directed by Stephanie Roth. The play highlighted the importance of kindness, a common theme at the Creative Enterprises center, which offers vocational and occupational training to adults with physical and intellectual disabilities.Ten castmates came together to perform “The Wrath of Wrong”, a play written and directed by Stephanie Roth. The play highlighted the importance of kindness, a common theme at the Creative Enterprises center, which offers vocational and occupational training to adults with physical and intellectual disabilities.The play featured Captain Kirk and his crew aboard the Creative Enterprises Starship, who find themselves at odds with Wrong, a supervillain who highjacks the ship and will wreak havoc on the galaxy unless the crew can discover a way to foil her plans. But when Wrong incurs an injury aboard the ship, the crew decides the best way to face their foe is to “Kill [her] with kindness!”

“Here at Creative, we always to try to highlight the positive, the kindness in everyone, so that’s something that really shows today,” said CEO Leigh McIntosh.

At the show’s close, the cast proudly stood before the applauding audience, joining hands and taking a bow in unison.

“I feel good,” Angel said after the play. “When I was doing the play, I was kind of nervous, but now that I’m done, I feel good.”

“I did great!” said Jackie, who played “Yeoman Rand.” Earlier, Jackie admitted to the Creative staff that she has “never done anything like this before and loves new experiences.”

A crafts class lead by Lisa Soucie designed the elaborate set for “The Wrath of Wrong” play at Creative Enterprises. They used recycled materials, electronics and gadgets to create a convincing spaceship, while donors paid for costumes, microphones and other materials.A crafts class lead by Lisa Soucie designed the elaborate set for “The Wrath of Wrong” play at Creative Enterprises. They used recycled materials, electronics and gadgets to create a convincing spaceship, while donors paid for costumes, microphones and other materials.“The fact that they did this even though they were nervous, there’s something to be said for that. It’s a lot of work, but we’re hoping this can become an annual event,” McIntosh said. “It gave two classes a project, and it became a real team effort.”

She explained that a crafts class lead by Lisa Soucie designed the elaborate set for the play. They used recycled materials, electronics and gadgets to create a convincing spaceship, while donors paid for costumes, microphones and other materials, as well as food for a lunch served before the performance. A few of those sponsors include: FireLine, Inc (Hollye and Billy McDonel); Kara Specht; Patty and Danny Pennington, and Sally and William Murray.

Serving clients in Gwinnett and Forsyth counties, Creative Enterprises is dedicated to providing employment opportunities along with social and life skills to individuals with disabilities. To learn more about visit https://www.creativeenterprises.org.